With Christmas fast approaching things at Higher Trewithen Holiday Cottages have really slowed down. We have a few bookings here and there but the main bulk of our time has been dedicated to settling the new residents in the field and gardens. In the early part of December we greeted Violet, Daisy and Harris our North Ronaldsay sheep.

The North Ronaldsay is an ancient breed of sheep that can be traced back to the Neolithic period. As the name suggests, the breed is native to North Ronaldsay. They live along the seashore on a diet of seaweed behind a stone wall called a dyke. The breed is very sensitive to copper and can die from copper poisoning so their diet has to be watched closely.  According to the Rare Breed Survival Trust (RBST) there are only around 500 to 900 breeding females in the UK. Both Violet and Daisy are among this number and are expected to lamb in April next year.

cornish cottages - higher trewithen december 2016

Other animals we’ve welcomed to Higher Trewithen a breeding pair of Pied/Crollwitzer Turkeys, that we’ve named Terrance (Terry) and Tallulah, and a breeding group of West of England Geese, which we are yet to name. They’re not feeling particularly happy at the moment as they, along with Doris, Rosie and Daisy, have to stay inside for 30 days due to the recent news about Avian Flu. We have to keep all the birds in to prevent them coming into contact with potentially contaminated wild birds, their faeces or infected food and water sources. It’s not ideal as they all love to be outside but we need to make sure they are kept safe and healthy.

cornish cottages - higher trewithen december 2016

While last month saw us removing trees, this moth we’ve been adding some. We planted six Cornish apple trees in our new orchard. Varieties we’ve chosen include; Ben’s Red, Dufflin, Duke of Cornwall, Cornish Aromatic, Cornish Pine and Tregonna King. With this bunch of beauties we’ve a range of cookers, dessert and cider apples. The blossom will prove a nice bit of colour in the spring and a great source of food for a range of wildlife throughout the year. We will also benefit by having some lovely fruit too!

While we’ve been really busy with improving the ground the quiet period has also given us a chance to give the cottages a good deep clean and an opportunity to take stock of what we have and have not got in each one of our cottages. This is a laborious task but essential for making sure that the guests at Higher Trewithen Holiday Cottages have everything they need during their stay.

cornish cottages - higher trewithen december 2016

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